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September 11th, 2014

BI_Sep08_CPredictive analytics has long been employed by large-scale businesses to help make decisions and long-term business predictions. Now, small to medium businesses are starting to integrate these methods in larger numbers. A common stumbling block for many managers and owners however is that this can be a highly overwhelming concept. To help, here is an overview of the three main components of predictive analytics business owners and managers should be aware of.

Together, these three elements of predictive analytics enables data scientists and even managers to conduct and analyze forecasts and predictions.

Component 1: data

As with most business processes, data is one of the most important and vital components. Without data you won't be able to make predictions and the decisions necessary to reach desired outcomes. In other words, data is the foundation of predictive analytics.

If you want predictive analytics to be successful, you need not only the right kind of data but information that is useful in helping answer the main question you are trying to predict or forecast. You need to to collect as much relevant data as possible in relation to what you are trying to predict. This means tracking past data, customers, demographics, and more.

Merely tracking data isn't going to guarantee more accurate predictions however. You will also need a way to store and quickly access this data. Most businesses use a data warehouse which allows for easier tracking, combining, and analyzing of data.

As a business manager you likely don't have the time to look after data and implement a full-on warehousing and storage solution. What you will most likely need to do is work with a provider, like us, who can help establish an effective warehouse solution, and an analytics expert who can help ensure that you are tracking the right, and most useful, data.

Component 2: statistics

Love it, or hate it, statistics, and more specifically regression analysis, is an integral part of predictive analytics. Most predictive analytics starts with usually a manager or data scientist wondering if different sets of data are correlated. For example, is the age, income, and sex of a customer (independent variables) related to when they purchase product X (dependent variable)?

Using data that has been collected from various customer touch points - say a customer loyalty card, past purchases made by the customer, data found on social media, and visits to a website - you can run a regression analysis to see if there is in fact a correlation between independent and dependent variables, and just how related individual independent variables are.

From here, usually after some trial and error, you hopefully can come up with a regression equation and assign what's called regression coefficients - how much each variable affects the outcome - to each of the independent variables.

This equation can then be applied to predict outcomes. To carry on the example above, you can figure out exactly how influential each independent variable is to the sale of product X. If you find that income and age of different customers heavily influences sales, you can usually also predict when customers of a certain age and income level will buy (by comparing the analysis with past sales data). From here, you can schedule promotions, stock extra products, or even begin marketing to other non-customers who fall into the same categories.

Component 3: assumptions

Because predictive analytics focuses on the future, which is impossible to predict with 100% accuracy, you need to rely on assumptions for this type of analytics to actually work. While there are likely many assumptions you will need to acknowledge, the biggest is: the future will be the same as the past.

As a business owner or manager you are going to need to be aware of the assumptions made for each model or question you are trying to predict the answer to. This also means that you will need to be revisiting these on a regular basis to ensure they are still true or valid. If something changes, say buying habits, then the predictions in place will be invalid and potentially useless.

Remember the 2008-09 sub-prime mortgage crisis? Well, one of the main reasons this was so huge was because brokers and analysts assumed that people would always be able to pay their mortgages, and built their prediction models off of this assumption. We all know what happened there. While this is a large scale example, it is a powerful lesson to learn: Not checking that the assumptions you have based your predictions on could lead to massive trouble for your company.

By understanding the basic ideas behind these three components, you will be better able to communicate and leverage the results provided by this form of analytics.

If you are looking to implement a solution that can support your analytics, or to learn more about predictive analytics, contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 11th, 2014

MobileGeneral_Sep08_CSmartphones and tablets have become one of the most essential devices for businesses and individuals alike. It's difficult to imagine life without one really, but there will come a time when we all need to replace a device. If you are considering this then you may entertain the idea of selling your old device too. However, before you do, you should ensure that you deauthenticate your apps first.

What exactly is deauthentication?

Some apps, although not all, require that you authenticate your device in order for them to work. Many developers who ask users to authenticate their device do so in order to either prevent copies of the software from being created and utilized, or to ensure that the device and app can communicate securely.

Some examples of apps that ask for authentication include those that use multi-factor authentication, password managers, and apps that require a subscription or credit card information, etc. On some devices you even need to enter a code or key, much like installing software on a new computer, in order to activate all the features of the app.

The main reason many developers require authentication is connected to security. As security is becoming an ever more pressing issue, there is a good chance that we will see more apps asking users to authenticate their devices in the future.

The issue with this is that when you go to sell your device you will likely need to purchase the app again or the buyer of the device won't be able to set up their own account.

Common apps you should deauthenticate

Apps with subscription services: This includes apps like Google Play Music, Spotify, Office for iPad, cloud storage apps that you have linked your device to, etc. These apps are usually either linked with your device or your phone number so it is a good idea to deauthenticate them.
  1. Kindle app: The Kindle app is actually linked to your device and users who want to use the app will likely not be able to if the device is linked to your account. You can unlink devices by going to the Amazon site, logging in and selecting Manage your Content and Devices when you hover over your account name.
  2. Password management apps: These apps usually require that you authenticate your device to use a particular service. If you try to log in on a new device, these apps may not work properly.
  3. Chat apps: Some chat apps like WhatsApp or Line require that you register for the service using your phone number. If you are keeping your number, you shouldn't have to deauthenticate, but if you are getting a new number, you should go into the account settings of each app and unlink your number. WhatsApp for example has a feature that allows you to move your number to a new device.
  4. Any app or service that you have linked credit card information to: While you ordinarily don't have to physically deauthenticate these apps, as the information is usually linked to an account and password, it is a good idea to unlink your credit card with any app on your phone before you hand it over. This will help ensure that credit card information is not stored or accessible.
When it comes to the major app stores, e.g., Windows Phone Store, Google Play, and iTunes, you will often see that your device has been linked to your account. If you are going to sell your device, the best course of action is to reset using the factory reset option. This will delete all data and installed apps on the device. This will often be enough to deauthenticate all apps.

If you are looking to learn more about getting rid of your older devices, contact us today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 10th, 2014

iPad_Seo08_CA common feature in many new apps is enabling users to purchase or subscribe to features in-app. This is especially true for developers like Microsoft and their Office for iPad apps which require a subscription in order to use the full versions. In a recent announcement from the Redmond tech giant, Office for iPad users can now subscribe via the app.

Looking at the recent subscription update

When the iPad versions of the Office apps were released, users could download the apps for free but needed an Office 365 subscription in order to use the full features of the apps. Those who didn't have a subscription were limited to only being able to read and print Office documents, and present using PowerPoint.

Those who wanted to use all the features of the app needed to sign up for an Office 365 account. In order to do this, they had to physically go to the Office 365 site and sign up. They couldn't sign up via the app. While this process isn't overly taxing, it did cause some frustration for some users.

To remedy this, Microsoft has recently announced that users will now be able to sign up for an Office 365 subscription directly from the app. According to an article posted on the Microsoft Office blog, "Starting today [September 2, 2014], you can buy a monthly subscription to Office 365 from within Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint for iPad."

The subscriptions you can purchase

While Microsoft has noted that you can purchase an Office 365 subscription in-app, you should be aware that the subscriptions are monthly and for the Home or Personal versions of Office 365.

A monthly Office 365 Home subscription costs USD$9.99 a month and can be used on one iPad and up to five PCs or Macs, while an Office 365 Personal plan costs USD$6.99 a month and can be installed on on iPad and one PC or Mac.

What about business users?

For the time being, users can only subscribe to individual Office 365 accounts via the app. If your business has an Office 365 for Business subscription e.g., Office 365 Small Business Premium, etc, you should be able to access the full-version of the iPad app without having to sign up for a Personal or Home subscription, just log in using the same username and password you use to sign into Office 365.

If you don't have an Office 365 subscription, then it may be a good idea to get in touch with us to learn more about Office 365 business plans and how they can be successfully implemented into your business.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic iPad
September 10th, 2014

Office_Sep08_CIf you use Excel there is a good chance that you have used a wide variety of formulas. But, when it comes to working out how to combine the content of different cells into a new one, without adding them together, many users will simply cut and paste. Did you know though that the concatenate formula can also do this for you?

Using the concatenate formula to combine cells

If, for example, you have a spreadsheet with first names in column A, last names in column B, and want to combine them into column C to display the full name you can do so by:
  1. Clicking on cell C2 (or the row where the information you want to combine is)
  2. Typing =concatenate(
  3. Clicking on cell A2 and then adding a comma (,)
  4. Clicking on cell B2 and closing the formula with a closing bracket
  5. Hitting Enter
You should see the two cells are now combined in cell C2, with the formula for cell C2 reading:

=CONCATENATE(A2,B2).

The problem is, there will be no space inbetween the letters or numbers, so you will need to edit the formula to read:

=CONCATENATE(A2," ",B2)

The double quotations with a space in between them tells Excel to add a space to the cell in between the contents of A2 and B2.

If you have more than two columns you would like to combine, then simply add a comma after each cell. If for example you have three columns (A1, B1, and C1) you would enter the formula:

=CONCATENATE(A1 " ",B1 " ",C1) in column D1.

Combining two cells without concatenate

While concatenate works well, there is actually a shortcut that you can use which involves the ampersand '&':
  1. Click on cell C2 (or the row where the information you want to combine is)
  2. Type =
  3. Click on cell A2 and then type & in the formula.
  4. Click on B2 and hit Enter
You should see the contents of A2 and B2 combined together in C2. If you click on cell C2 and look at the formula, it should read: =A2&B2.

The only problem is, there won't be a space between the content. To add a space, you can edit the formula so that it reads:

=A2&" "&B2

Note the space between the two quotation marks. This tells Excel to add a space between the contents of A2 and B2.

Once you have the base formula on one cell, you can press the small box at the bottom of the cell and drag it down the row so that the other information can be quickly compiled. This makes it much easier than having to copy and paste the content individually. And, If you would like to learn more Excel tips, contact us today. We can save you valuable time and resources.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 5th, 2014

HealthcareIT_Sep03_A

As of June 30, 2014, more than 1,000 data breaches affecting more than 500 patients each have been reported to the Department of Health & Human Services - for a total of roughly 32,000,000 people who have had their privacy compromised. And, according to the annual Redspin Breach Report, published in February of 2014, 7.1 million patient records were breached in 2013, a 137.7% increase over 2012.

And, the threat is getting broader. Once caused primarily by snooping or negligent employees, data breaches are now increasingly caused by cybercriminals who realize the potential financial value of medical records. Case in point: The Chinese hacker attack on the 206-hospital Community Health Systems which resulted in the breach of 4.5 million patient records, the second-largest HIPAA breach ever reported.

No physician practice should consider itself immune. While large hospital systems may be most attractive to hackers, Eric Perakslis, executive director of Harvard Medical School's Center for Biomedical Informatics, recently wrote in a New England Journal of Medicine article that 72 percent of cyberattacks have been aimed at hospitals, group practices and other provider organizations.

Perakslis recommends an "active learning approach” that involves real-time surveillance of emerging threats - and that includes an intimate knowledge of one's own network and vigilance at one's own practice. One of the most effective ways you can do this is to work with a company like ours who can help not only ensure security of your systems but also help teach you and your staff about common security issues.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 5th, 2014

GeneralHealthcare_Sep03_AThe Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is making it more difficult for physicians to prescribe opioids, and in doing so, has necessitated changes to e-prescribing.

The issue stems from titles II and III of the Comprehensive Substance Act (CSA), under which controlled substances are classified into one of five schedules based on potential for abuse and likelihood of dependence. The DEA has rescheduled hydrocodone-combination products (HCPs) from schedule III to schedule II in an attempt to curtail abuse and dependence.

But, the regulations around schedule II drugs are much more restrictive than those around schedule III drugs. There will be only two ways to prescribe HCPs after the rule change becomes effective October 6: with a paper-based prescription handed to the patient or e-prescribing. Any other means of prescribing, such as phone calls or faxes, are not allowed.

For e-prescribing, some changes may be necessary at the electronic medical record (EMR) level and at medical practices as well as at pharmacies. EMR vendors and practices will have to implement the security that's required by the DEA in regards to identity management and factor authentication. As for pharmacies, currently only about two-thirds are ready to receive electronic prescriptions of controlled substances; the others will have to make some changes.

If you are one of the practices that needs to make these changes in order to meet DEA requirements, contact us today to see how our systems can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 5th, 2014

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Dave

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Topic Articles
September 4th, 2014

Security_Sep02_CWhat do you do when your smartphone needs to be charged but your charger is not at hand? A handy solution is to turn to a public charging kiosk. But what you might not be aware of is the fact that this can lead to juice jacking of your smartphone. To avoid this security threat, it’s time to get a comprehensive view of what juice jacking is and how you can protect your smartphone from it.

What’s juice jacking?

Regardless of the kind of smartphone you have, whether it’s an Android, iPhone or BlackBerry, there is one common feature across all phones: the power supply and the data stream pass over the same cable. This setup allows for juice jacking during the charging process whereby user access is gained on your phone by leveraging the USB data/power cable to illegitimately access your phone’s data and/or inject malicious code onto the device.

The attack can be as simple as an invasion of privacy, wherein your phone pairs with a computer concealed within the charging kiosk and information such as private photos and contact information are transferred to a malicious device. However, on the other hand, it can also be as invasive as an injection of malicious code directly into your phone. According to security researchers at this year’s Black Hat security conference, your iPhone can be compromised within one minute of being plugged into a harmful charger.

Exposure to a malicious kiosk can also create a lingering security problem even without the immediate injection of malicious code. Once a device is paired to a computer, it can access a host of personal information on the device, including your address book, notes, photos, music, sms database, typing cache, and even initiate a full backup of your phone, all of which can be accessed wirelessly at anytime.

How do I avoid it?

The most effective precautions center around simply not charging your phone using a third-party system. Here are some tips to help you avoid using public kiosk charger:
  • Keep your devices topped off: Make it a habit to charge your phone at your home and office when you’re not actively using it or are just sitting at your desk working.
  • Carry a personal charger: Chargers have become very small and portable, from USB cables to power banks. Get one and throw it in your bag so you can charge your phone anytime you’re at the office or while on-the-go if you use a power bank.
  • Carry a backup battery: If you’re not keen on bringing a spare charger or power bank, you can opt to carry a full spare battery if your device has a removable battery.
  • Lock your phone: When your phone is truly locked as in inaccessible without the input of a pin or equivalent passcode, your phone should not be able to be paired with the device it’s connected to.
  • Power the phone down: This technique only works on phones on a model-by-model basis as some phones will, despite being powered down, still power on the entire USB circuit and allow access to the flash storage in the device.
  • Use power only USB cables: These cables are missing the two wires necessary for data transmission and have only the two wires for power transmission remaining. They will charge your device, but data transfer is made impossible.
Even the tiniest detail like charging your phone from a kiosk charger could affect the security of your device. While there are many substitutes to using a third-party system, ultimately the best defense against a compromised mobile device is awareness. Looking to learn more about today’s security and threats? Contact us today and see how we can help.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Security
September 4th, 2014

Hardware_Sep02_CBusinesses today rely heavily on technology on a daily basis. And regardless of the industry you’re involved in, an essential piece of hardware is the computer monitor, whether used at work or in the home. While computer monitors come in a variety of shapes, designs, and colors, did you know that they can also be categorized broadly into three different types based on the technology used to make them?

CRT (cathode ray tube) monitors

These monitors employ CRT technology, which was used most commonly in the manufacturing of television screens. With these monitors, a stream of intense high energy electrons is used to form images on a fluorescent screen. A cathode ray tube is basically a vacuum tube containing an electron gun at one end and a fluorescent screen at another end.

While CRT monitors can still be found in some organizations, many offices have stopped using them largely because they are heavy, bulky, and costly to replace should they break. While they are still in use, it would be a good idea to phase these monitors out for cheaper, lighter, and more reliable monitors.

LCD (liquid crystal display) monitors

The LCD monitor incorporates one of the most advanced technologies available today. Typically, it consists of a layer of color or monochrome pixels arranged schematically between a couple of transparent electrodes and two polarizing filters. Optical effect is made possible by polarizing the light in varied amounts and making it pass through the liquid crystal layer. The two types of LCD technology available are the active matrix of TFT and a passive matrix technology. TFT generates better picture quality and is more secure and reliable. Passive matrix, on the other hand, has a slow response time and is slowly becoming outdated.

The advantages of LCD monitors include their compact size which makes them lightweight. They also don't consume much electricity as CRT monitors, and can be run off of batteries which makes them ideal for laptops.

Images transmitted by these monitors don’t get geometrically distorted and have little flicker. However, this type of monitor does have disadvantages, such as its relatively high price, an image quality which is not constant when viewed from different angles, and a monitor resolution that is not always constant, meaning any alterations can result in reduced performance.

LED (light-emitting diodes) monitors

LED monitors are the latest types of monitors on the market today. These are flat panel, or slightly curved displays which make use of light-emitting diodes for back-lighting, instead of cold cathode fluorescent (CCFL) back-lighting used in LCDs. LED monitors are said to use much lesser power than CRT and LCD and are considered far more environmentally friendly.

The advantages of LED monitors are that they produce images with higher contrast, have less negative environmental impact when disposed, are more durable than CRT or LCD monitors, and features a very thin design. They also don’t produce much heat while running. The only downside is that they can be more expensive, especially for the high-end monitors like the new curved displays that are being released.

Being aware of the different types of computer monitors available should help you choose one that’s most suited to your needs. Looking to learn more about hardware in today’s world? Contact us and see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Hardware
September 4th, 2014

Source: www.azcentral.com

Cloud

 

A recent hack that leaked nude photos of celebrities has raised questions about how safe the cloud is.

How safe is the cloud? That’s one of many questions we should all be asking after learning of a recent hack that leaked nude photos of celebrities including Kate Upton and Jennifer Lawrence.

Hackers stole the pictures by finding a way into the cloud, and whether or not you’re storing nude pictures in the cloud, you probably don’t want people accessing your personal information. So, here are the answers to the questions you’re probably asking … and if you’re not, you should be.

1409706983000-164550851• What is “the cloud”?

It’s another way of referring to cloud computing. According to PC Magazine, “In the simplest terms, cloud computing means storing and accessing data and programs over the Internet instead of your computer’s hard drive.” Basically, it gives you a backup and saves space on your devices.

• Could this kind of leak happen to you?

Absolutely. “Every major cloud vendor has been breached in one way or another,” said David Carattini, president and CEO of Arizona Tech Works in Goodyear. So, no matter what cloud service you use, he offers this advice. “My recommendation would be to assume the worst and expect the best,” Carattini said.

Read more…

Topic Articles